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EPA Loosens Safety Checks on Dangerous Chemicals

EPA Loosens Safety Checks on Dangerous ChemicalsThe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is loosening safety checks on dangerous chemicals such as dry cleaning fluid and other hazardous substances. After the chemical industry hounded the federal government to reduce the level at which health risks are determined regarding dangerous chemicals, the EPA will not target the potential exposure of chemicals in the air, ground, or bodies of water and focus instead on the danger of direct contact of chemicals on humans. An EPA spokesperson claims that other established laws like the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and others already give license to the EPA to regulate chemical exposure found in the air, ground, and water. Unfortunately, by scaling back on chemical safety checks, it may lead to inaccurate statistics regarding potential harm and a reduction in categorizing the risk levels of chemical exposure, which means lifting or lessening restrictions against the use of the chemicals.

Perchloroethylene, used in dry cleaning fluid, 1,4-dioxane, found in antifreeze, deodorants, shampoos, and cosmetics, and trichloroethylene, used in refrigerant chemicals, all pose threats to humans by causing cancer, serious medical issues, and potential fatalities. Scaling back on the 2016 law that guaranteed that hundreds of toxic chemicals would be tested and possibly abolished from use may mean widespread contamination and significant public health challenges for millions of people. Chemical exposure in the air, water, which includes sources for drinking water, and the ground brings just as many lethal consequences as direct contact.

If you or someone you love developed medical conditions due to toxic chemical exposure, contact our Philadelphia environmental lawyers at Williams Cedar at 215-557-0099 or contact us online. Our offices are centrally located in Philadelphia and Cherry Hill, New Jersey to serve clients throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and across the nation.