Phila Civil Rights Lawyers | Court Rules in Favor of PA Salary History Ban
logo
MENU

Court Rules in Favor of Philadelphia Salary History Ban

Employers in Philadelphia now face stricter restrictions on the type of information they can ask of potential employees. After a recent decision by a federal appellate court, it is now illegal for Philadelphia employers to ask prospective employees about their salary history. Banning salary history questions has been viewed as one way to reduce the amount of race and gender discrimination, which can occur during the hiring process. Many worker advocacy groups argue employers may use a job applicant’s salary history as a basis for offering smaller salaries to individuals who have historically earned less money, including women and workers of color. By offering a job with lower wages based on an applicant’s prior salary history, employers further the detrimental effects of past race and gender discrimination.

Third Circuit Ruling

In its landmark unanimous decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit reversed the trial court’s decision, which allowed employers to ask about salary history. The appellate court decision focused on equality and the protection of a job applicant’s civil rights.

Under the new ruling, employers can neither ask about a job applicant’s salary history nor use prior salary history to set wages. The Court found removing the ban was an important step in preventing past wage discrimination. Employers violating the new law could face fines and lawsuits. The Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations will enforce the law on behalf of the city.

Opponents of the ban, including the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, filed the original lawsuit to abolish the ban on behalf of several high-profile Philadelphia employers, including Comcast. Many employers view the ban as prohibitive to business growth and in violation of their commercial speech rights.  An appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court is expected as legal challenges to similar salary history bans in other states continue to make their way through state and federal courts.

National Significance

Philadelphia’s salary history ban is another victory for the wage equity movement, which promotes equal pay for equal work. The average woman currently makes 80 cents for every dollar a man makes, with the wage gap even higher for minority women. Pay equality advocates believe banning the salary history question is an important step in acknowledging that male and female workers should be paid equally if they are performing the same job in the same organization.

Protecting the Civil Rights of Job Applicants

When a potential employer asks illegal questions during a job interview, they can face liability for civil rights violations. Individuals who are victims of illegal civil rights violations may be entitled to compensation. By contacting an experienced Philadelphia civil rights lawyer for assistance, individuals who have experienced this type of discrimination can take the first step in holding violators responsible.

Philadelphia Civil Rights Lawyers at Williams Cedar Obtain Compensation for Victims of Illegal Discrimination

If you believe your civil rights were violated, the experienced Philadelphia civil rights lawyers at Williams Cedar are here to help. We proudly fight to protect the civil rights of all individuals while helping them obtain the maximum amount of available compensation. Located in Philadelphia and Haddonfield, New Jersey, we represent individuals whose civil rights have been violated throughout Pennsylvania, South Jersey, and nationwide. To schedule a free consultation, call us today at 215-557-0099 or contact us online.

WILLIAMS CEDAR PHYSICAL LOCATIONS: NOTICE TO OUR CLIENTS, COLLEAGUES AND VENDORS: CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE

WILLIAMS CEDAR PHYSICAL LOCATIONS: NOTICE TO OUR CLIENTS, COLLEAGUES AND VENDORS: CORONAVIRUS RESPONSE

In order to protect the health and safety of our staff and clients, and in compliance with directives from the governors of New Jersey and Pennsylvania and the City of Philadelphia, our physical offices in Philadelphia and Haddonfield will be closed for an indeterminate time, in an effort to help halt the spread of the corona virus.

Please be assured that, during our physical absence, our team will remain working remotely (at home) and “virtually” on behalf of our clients, and will keep them informed of any developments in their cases. We will return phone calls as quickly as possible. Clients, co-counsel, referral counsel and opposing counsel can also communicate with our attorneys through email:

Samuel Abloeser : sabloeser@williamscedar.com | David Cedar : dcedar@williamscedar.com
Beth Cole : bcole@williamscedar.com | Diane Fenner : dfenner@williamscedar.com
Shauna Friedman : sfriedman@williamscedar.com | Kevin Haverty : khaverty@williamscedar.com
Chris Markos : cmarkos@williamscedar.com | Alan Sklarsky : asklarsky@williamscedar.com
Jerry Williams : gwilliams@williamscedar.com

We will notify you when we are able to return to our physical offices. In the meantime, feel free to contact us. We remain on the job! We wish you the best of Health as we weather this crisis together.

THE LAWYERS AND STAFF OF WILLIAMS CEDAR